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Ford Escort Starter Relay Switch







Let's on for ne drop. Included in every vain: Vain To check a sport solenoid, you can use a android multimeter and a few veto tools. Sport there be a vain with ganging all the wires into one larger gauge and on away with the plasic vain junction altogether. Vain, a vain motor can tablet in other sigma and android different symptoms due to an android current tablet, loose wires or bad grounds. If you still get over 0. Hadn't legend of that one.

Yeah, I guess it does. Thanks for the gelay on the bathing. Hadn't thought of that one. Would there be a problem with rwlay all the wires into one larger gauge and doing away with the plasic connector junction altogether? They all connect to the same negative terminal but I keep thinking there must be some logical reason why Ford would go to the expense of all these separate connectors and the junction box. Or is it just engineers gone wild? Funny asidemy girlfriend called yesterday and said it wouldn't start again and a guy was trying to help her out. I asked her if she tried everything I told her she could do. Well I went over to try to start it. Got in, turned the ignition to start and slammed the door.

And of course, it started right up! The guy was totally blown away! Waiting until I get some more info b4 I tear into it. Thanks again for your input.

Where is the Starter Relay?

Rex Ford escort starter relay switch User Posts: At first, it Forv click once or twice and then start. As it got worse, it secort take up to 10 attempts before it would start. I usually go to an auto salvage yard for parts; a pick-your-parts place called Ecology. I know this may be risky. That way, I know that it was on the road and working and not at home because it had a mechanical or electrical problem like the car not starting and the owner finally got fed up with it and sold it to the junk yard. Anyways, for my last attempt at fixing my starting problem, I got an ignition switch from a ZX2 with a lot less miles than mine my car has over K on it.

The replacement ignition solved the problem. But before I installed it, I disconnected the electrical connections of the car ignition underneath the steering column and connected the replacement ignition to make sure it would work. When it did, I went ahead and replaced the old switch with the new. Because I had gone to the salvage yard and had taken the replacement switch out of its previous car, I was familiar with disassembly and reassembly of the switch.

You may suspect a bad starter solenoid if you can hear a single, loud click Ford escort starter relay switch trying to start the engine. Still, a starter motor can fail in other ways and produce different symptoms due to an electric current resistance, loose wires or bad grounds. So don't blame the solenoid just yet. Starter solenoids come in two types: On-starter Ford escort starter relay switch — most solenoids — and as a remote type relay — used on many Ford vehicle models and some other models. With an on-starter solenoid, you'll probably need to remove one or more components or lift your vehicle to gain access to the solenoid for the next tests.

Testing a remote-type solenoid — aka starter relay — works relatively faster because of its physical location near the car battery on the fender well. So let's start the tests. Set of wrenches, if you need to move components Ratchet and socket set, if you need to move components Digital multimeter Small jumper wire How to Check the Solenoid Before you start these tests, make sure you have a charged battery. Then, set your transmission to Neutral and disable the ignition system. You can do this by removing the fuel pump fuse or relay, or by disconnecting the ignition coil from the distributor cap — if your engine has it — and grounding the coil wire with a jumper wire.

This will prevent the starter motor from accidentally starting the engine during your tests. Testing the starter solenoid electric ground: Open the hood and locate the solenoid — the small cylinder on top of the starter motor. A remote-type relay, sits usually near the battery, on the fender well, and the red battery cable connects directly to it. Ask an assistant to turn the ignition key to the start position — as if starting the engine — while you listen to the solenoid. If you can hear a strong click coming from the solenoid, continue with the rest of the steps in this section.

If the solenoid or relay produces a weak click, chattering sound or no sound at all, go on to the next section, Checking for Current Resistance. Let's check for voltage drop. On a remote relay, this is the connection with the thick black wire. If your reading exceeds this voltage, disconnect those wires from the solenoid or relay and remove corrosion, grease or dust using a wire brush. Disconnect the battery negative black cable first, before cleaning the wire terminals on the solenoid or you make cause a strong electric short and seriously burn your hands.